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Institutional Self-Evaluation Report

In Support of an Application for Reaffirmation of Accreditation

 

Submitted by:

Las Positas College

3000 Campus Hill Drive

Livermore, California 94551

 

 

Submitted to:

Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges

Western Association of Schools and Colleges

 

January 2022


 

Certification

To:����� Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges

����������� Western Association of Schools and Colleges

 

From: Dr. Dyrell Foster, President

����������� Las Positas College

����������� 3000 Campus Hill Drive

����������� Livermore, California 94551

 

This Institutional Self-Evaluation Report is submitted to the ACCJC for the purpose of assisting in the determination of the institution�s accreditation status.

I certify there was effective participation by the campus, and believe the Self-Evaluation Report accurately reflects the nature and substance of this institution.

Signatures:

______________________________________________________________________________ Mr. Ronald P. Gerhard, Chancellor, Chabot-Las Positas Community College District

 

_____________________________________________________________________________Dr. Dyrell Foster, President, Las Positas College

 

______________________________________________________________________________Ms. Genevieve Randolph, President, Board of Trustees, Chabot-Las Positas Community College District

_____________________________________________________________________________Dr. Kristina Whalen, Vice President, Academic Services, Accreditation Liaison Officer

 

_____________________________________________________________________________Ms. Sarah Thompson, President, Academic Senate

 

______________________________________________________________________________Ms. Jean O�Neil-Opipari, President, Classified Senate

_____________________________________________________________________________Mr. Kyle Johnson, President, Student Senate

 

Table of Contents

 

Part A: Introduction5

Recent Major Improvements5

History of Las Positas College7

Student Enrollment Data9

Part B: Presentation of Student Achievement Data and Institution-Set Standards19

Course Success Rates19

Fall-to-Fall Persistence Rates of New First-Time College Students by Race/Ethnicity20

Chart 11: Fall-to-Fall Retention Rates by Race/Ethnicity for First-Time College Students20

Degrees Awarded21

Certificates Awarded22

Transfers to Public California Universities23

Institution-Set Standards and Stretch Goal 24

Course Completion Rates24

Degree Completions25

Certificate Completions26

Transfer Completions27

Programmatic Accreditation27

Part C: Organization of the Self-Evaluation Process28

Las Positas College 2022 Institutional Self-Evaluation Reports (ISER) Timeline31

Las Positas College 2022 Institutional Self-Evaluation Report (ISER) 34

Accreditation Steering Committee Members34

Las Positas College 2022 Institutional Self-Evaluation Report (ISER) 35

Expanded Accreditation Steering Committee Members and Assignments35

Part D: Organizational Information37

Office of the President 37

Office of the Vice President, Academic Services38

Office of the Vice President Administrative Services39

Office of the Vice President, Student Services40

District-wide Function Map � Summary41

Part E: Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements66

Eligibility Requirement 1: Authority66

Eligibility Requirement 2: Operational Status 66

Eligibility Requirement 3: Degrees66

Eligibility Requirement 4: Chief Executive Officer 67

Eligibility Requirement 5: Financial Accountability67

Part F: Certification of Continued Institutional Compliance with Commission Policies67

Public Notification of an Evaluation Team And Third Party Comment 67

Standards and Performance with Respect to Student Achievement 68

Credits, Program Length, and Tuition68

Transfer Policies69

Distance Education and Correspondence Education69

Student Complaints70

Institutional Disclosure and Advertising and Recruitment Materials71

Title IV Compliance71

Part G: Institutional Analysis71

Standard I: Mission, Academic Quality and Institutional Effectiveness, and Integrity71

I.A. Mission72

Conclusions on Standard I.A. - The Mission79

I.B. Assuring Academic Quality and Institutional Effectiveness79

Conclusions on Standard I.B. - Assuring Academic Quality and Institutional Effectiveness89

I.C.Institutional Integrity89

Conclusions on Standard I.C. 104

Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Support Services105

II.A. Instructional Programs105

Conclusions on Standard II.A. - Instructional Programs137

II.B.Library and Learning Support Services137

Conclusions on Standard II.B. - Library and Learning Support Services149

II.C.Student Support Services149

Standard III: Resources164

III.A. Human Resources 164

Conclusion on Standard III.A. 185

III.B.Physical Resources186

Conclusions on Standard III.B. - Physical Resources193

III.C. Technology Resources193

Conclusions on Standard III.C. - Technology Resources204

III.D. Financial Resources204

Standard IV: Leadership and Governance222

Part H: Quality Focus Essay270

 

Part A: Introduction

 

When the current ACCJC Standards were approved in 2014, The Aspen Institute for College Excellence stated that �Virtually all aspects of community college operations are under strain. They must contend with institutional expenses outpacing revenues, student felt impacts of rising food, housing scarcity and mental health challenges, stagnant incomes, changing regulatory environments, and growing pressure to deliver more credentials of greater value to a more diverse population at a lower per-pupil cost (Aspen Institute, 2014). Since 2014, strain has compounded. A prolonged pandemic ushered in unprecedented declines in enrollment, particularly among under-served populations for whom community colleges represent a vital pathway to educational, career-technical, and professional opportunities. An urgent call to action to address and redress intolerable racism adds another tier of complexity.

 

Yet every layer of challenge finds a counterpoint in opportunity. The Institutional Self-Evaluation Report was one of the many ways Las Positas College stood at a unique confluence of events and explored possibilities. During a time of social distancing, our college community maintained immediacy, and even closeness, through deep reflection. During the added strain of a global pandemic, we successfully reviewed and revised our mission, vision, and values as a precursor to campus-wide involvement in strategic planning. Work on the Educational Master Plan overlapped with the reflective work of the institutional self-evaluation. As it did for many institutions, the global pandemic exposed gaps in our thinking, service, and programming. It was an exceptionally opportune time to examine ourselves, our mission, instructional and student support services, and the general health and wellness of our college with an eye toward continuous improvement.

 

 

Recent Major Improvements

 

Call to Action--Anti Racism. Las Positas College faced the urgent and renewed call to combat racism and anti-blackness with purposeful activity.Las Positas President Dyrell Foster convened a �Call to Action� and a committed group of staff and students organized a set of priorities around the common goal of anti-racism.The Black Cultural Resource Center is an early success and aligns with our Education Master Plan goal of being �a designation campus for Black students and other students of color�.The President's Speaker series continues to develop and mature anti-racism discussions and guide decision-making on campus and in our larger community.

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Shared Governance Improvements. Since the last Institutional Self-Evaluation, Las Positas College has continued to codify its governance processes in the Shared Governance Handbook. The most recent update incorporates two new committees to support strategic plans and planning priorities: the Budget Development Committee and the Career Technical Education Committee. These committees allow the college to seed focused discussions on the budgetary implications of maintaining the college�s diverse programs and services while exploring new directions and programs, such as our Shop Ironworkers Apprenticeship and recent certificates in Artificial Intelligence and Drone Navigation.

Stronger and New Educational Partnerships. Las Positas College�s strong existing partnerships with the city of Livermore yielded a Youth Build grant and heavy involvement in Livermore�s designation as an All-American City. Inclusive in the award was recognition of College�s commitment to provide scholarship and training in 20th Century Policing. These community-public safety partnerships join Fire Service Instructional Service Agreements to solidify Las Positas College�s place as a regional public safety training academy ahead of the completion of its new complex.New partnerships grew as Las Positas College partnered with the Federal Correctional Institute in Dublin to award over 80 non-credit business certificates.The partnership continues to deepen with the award of a federal grant that makes it possible to offer a credit-earning Associate's degree in Business Administration to students at the prison.

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Guided Pathways Momentum. Guided Pathways leaders reached major milestones with the development of Academic and Career Pathways, each pathway degree and certificate married with a course sequencing program map.Each milestone was reached with broad campus input and student participation.Las Positas College was accepted into the California Guided Pathway Demonstration Project and is prioritizing the next milestone�student success teams for each pathway.

 

Institutional Effectiveness and Planning. The completion of an Educational Master Plan (EMP) 2021-2026 positioned the campus to refresh and recommit to past goals and strategies and to add �organizational effectiveness� and �equity and anti-racism� into its strategic visioning. An Economic and Workforce Development Plan will work in concert with the EMP to position the college as an engine of post-pandemic economic recovery and growth.

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Student Leadership. Student leaders organize and operate a food distribution to the community. The Market provides food assistance to approximately 150 families each month. Student leaders are at the helm of important social justice efforts, including engagement with local Native American tribal leaders to thoughtfully craft a set of practices for land acknowledgment at Las Positas College and a resolution in support of the LGBTQ inclusive classroom practices.��

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Support for the Arts. Las Positas College launched a new Actor�s Conservatory, one of only two in the California Community Colleges. The Art on Campus Committee relaunched its efforts and is organizing new art installations on campus, primarily in support of artists of color.To that end, an expansive mural from artist Aaron dela Cruz adorns the 1600 building.Finally, with support from the Las Positas College Foundation, Las Positas College hosted a virtual Literary Arts Festival in the spring.��

History of Las Positas College

 

Las Positas College (LPC) is one of two accredited colleges in the Chabot-Las Positas Community College District and principally serves residents from the Tri-Valley communities of Dublin, Livermore, and Pleasanton, and several unincorporated areas, including Sunol.Chabot College, located in Hayward, serves the western portion of the District, which includes the communities of Ashland, Castro Valley, Cherryland, Fairview, Hayward, San Leandro, San Lorenzo, and Union City.

 

Four community college districts�Contra Costa Community College District, Peralta Community College District, Ohlone Community College District, and San Joaquin Delta Community College District �flank the Chabot-Las Positas Community College District to the north, south, and east.

 

LPC began as a Chabot College extension center in 1963, offering 24 classes and enrolling 820 students at Livermore High School and two other sites. By 1965, the program had expanded and moved to Granada High School in Livermore; it subsequently grew to include Amador and Dublin High Schools. The District purchased the 147-acre Livermore site that same year, intending to develop a comprehensive community college. However, in 1970 and again in 1972, bond issues to build the college failed�despite the overwhelming support of Tri-Valley voters�because the District�s largest voting population lived outside the proposed college�s service area.Lacking funds to develop a comprehensive community college, the Board of Trustees voted to develop a small education center on the Livermore site. On March 31, 1975, �Valley Campus� opened as the Livermore Education Center of Chabot College.

 

Las Positas College (LPC) has since developed into an accredited, comprehensive institution. In 1988, the Board of Governors designated LPC as an independent college and the institution received accreditation on January 7, 1991, from the Accrediting Commission of Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges.ACCJC reaffirmed accreditation in 1997, 2003, 2009, and 2015.

 

Educational Opportunities at LPC

 

Today, LPC offers a range of educational programs in keeping with its founding mission to create an environment that �offers educational opportunities and support for completion to students� transfer, degree, and career-technical goals while promoting lifelong learning.� As of fall 2021, LPC offers 27 Associate of Arts degrees, 21 Associate of Arts Transfer degrees, 31 Associate of Science degrees, 8 Associate of Science Transfer degrees, 93 credit certificate programs, and 25 non-credit certificate programs.

The college participates in collaborative strategies with local businesses and industry to strengthen and expand community participation in the Career Technical Education (CTE) programs.Service on advisory committees by local business and industry representatives strengthens the curriculum and ensures its accuracy and currency.Students directly benefit from partnerships that expand internship opportunities, worksite experiences, and service learning.An important feature of LPC�s CTE programs is the integration of classroom instruction with real-world work experiences in laboratories and facilities both on- and off-campus.These hands-on learning opportunities provide students the practical experience needed to give them a competitive advantage when seeking employment.A few examples of such specialized facilities and worksite learning locations include:

 

       Early Care Education students working in a laboratory classroom with young children at LPC�s Child Development Center.

       Fire Service Technology students receiving applied learning at the Livermore-Pleasanton Fire Department's Fire Training Facility.

       Engineering Technology students serving in paid internships at Lawrence Livermore National Labs, Lam Research, and Sandia National Labs.

       Technical Theater students working in real-world performing arts productions at the Bankhead Theater and Livermore Performing Arts.

       Emergency Medical Technician/Paramedic students gaining clinical experience at regional hospitals including Kaiser, Doctor's, Stanford, and Oak Valley.

 

LPC�s certificates, as well as some of the associate of science degrees awarded in CTE majors, are designed for students interested in immediate employment.Other associate of science degrees awarded in CTE majors, however, are designed for students who intend to transfer to a four-year college or university.LPC offers CTE certificates and degrees in the following disciplines: Administration of Justice, Applied Photography, Automotive Technology, Business, Commercial Music, Computer Studies, Early Care and Education, Emergency Medical Technician/Paramedic, Engineering Technology, Fire Service Technology, Digital Media & Graphic Design, Horticulture, Interior Design, Journalism, Kinesiology, Occupational Health & Safety, Technical Theater, Viticulture & Winery Technology, and Welding Technology.

Finally, LPC recently re-inserted �lifelong learning� into its mission statement. In keeping with this commitment, the college currently offers a variety of community education fee-based courses geared toward personal development and enrichment.

 

Student Enrollment Data

 

Chart 1 displays the headcount and enrollment of LPC students between fall 2010 and fall 2020.  With the exception of the years on either end of the decade, trends in headcount (unduplicated count) and enrollment (i.e., seats filled) have been relatively stable.Changes in headcount and enrollment generally reflect variations in the local economy or changes in state funding levels.Such was the case in 2010, when LPC�s relatively high enrollment was linked to the effects of the Great Recession.�� The significant drop in headcount and enrollment in fall 2020, however, is attributed not to economic changes or funding levels but to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Chart 1: Las Positas College Headcount and Enrollment Count, Fall 2010-2020

 

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Chart 2 shows that LPC has become an increasingly diverse campus over the course of the past decade.The proportion of White students has decreased from a slight majority (50.1%) to a little under one-third (32.0%), while the proportion of Latinx students and Asian students has increased from 18.8 to 30 percent and 12.3 to 18 percent respectively.Meanwhile, the percentage of African American students decreased slightly from 4.9 to 4 percent. The Multiracial category, introduced in fall 2011, represented 7.0 percent of the student population in fall 2020.

 

Chart 2: Race/Ethnicity of Las Positas College Students, Fall 2010 vs. Fall 2020

Note: Multiracial category was not available in Fall 2010.

 


 

Chart 3 shows that the LPC student population became younger in the ten years since 2010.For example, the percentage of students aged 21 or younger increased from 51 percent to 55 percent while students aged 40 or older decreased from 16 percent to 10 percent of the population.It should be noted that the median age of students in fall 2020 was 21.

 

 

Chart 3: Age Groups of Las Positas Students, Fall 2010 v. Fall 2020

 

 

 


 

Chart 4 shows the gender of LPC students by age group. While overall there are more females than males attending college, the percentages vary greatly by age group.The percentage of females and males aged 24 or younger are similar. However, students aged 25 or older are largely female.  Of the students who are 30 or older, more than 60 percent are female.

 

Chart 4: Gender of Las Positas Students by Age, Fall 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Chart 5 shows the educational goal of LPC students in fall 2010 versus fall 2020. The proportion of students who plan to transfer increased from 56 percent in fall 2010 to 66 percent in fall 2020, with the vast majority intending to transfer after earning an associate's degree. During the same period, the percentage of undecided students decreased from 15 percent to 9 percent of the population. The percentage of students who have other goals (e.g., associate degree only, certificate/job training, professional development) has decreased slightly or remained relatively stable. 

 

 

Chart 5: Educational Goals of Las Positas College Students Fall 2010 v Fall 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Chart 6 shows a steady increase in the number of units taken by students. The percentage of students taking the fewest units (e.g., 0.5 to 5.5 units) decreased from 29 percent in fall 2010 to 22 percent in fall 2020 while the number of students taking six to 11.5 units increased from 32 percent to 39 percent. The percentage of full-time students stayed relatively stable.  However, the percentage of full-time students taking a high number of units (15 or more) has increased slightly, from 12 percent in fall 2010 to 14 percent in fall 2020.

 

 

Chart 6: LPC Students� Unit Load, Fall 2010-2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Chart 7 shows the percentage of first-generation college students.First-generation status reflects the degree to which students and their families are familiar with college culture as well as how likely they are to successfully navigate the higher education system. Overall, slightly more than half of LPC�s students (53%) are first-generation college students. First-generation college student status varies greatly by race and ethnicity, with Pacific Islander students having the highest rate (82%) and Filipino students having the lowest (37%).

 

 

Chart 7: First-Generation College Students: All Students by Race/Ethnicity, Fall 2020

 

Notes: N represents the total number of students in each group.The data excludes students for whom we are missing first generation information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Chart 8 shows the number of low-income students attending LPC between fall 2010 and fall 2020. The percentage of low-income students increased from 29 percent in fall 2010 to a high of 39 percent in fall 2014 and then decreased to 34 percent in fall 2020.

 

 

Chart 8: Low-Income Students at Las Positas College, Fall Semester 2010-2020

 

 

Note: These calculations exclude non-credit students because they are not eligible for financial aid.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Students Finding a Job Closely Related to their Field of Study

 

An important component of LPC�s mission is to advance the work related to Career and Technical Education (CTE). A key measure of the college�s effectiveness in CTE, and one which is part of the California Community Colleges Chancellor�s Office�s Vision for Success, is students finding a job that is closely related to their field of study. As shown in Chart 9, the percentage of students finding a job closely related to their field of study steadily increased from 66 percent in 2016 to 73 percent in 2019 and then decreased slightly to 71 percent in 2020.

 

 

Chart 9: Increase in Students Finding Work Closely or Very Closely Related to Their Field of Study

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Job Projections by Industry in Alameda County

 

Table 1 shows that, as of 2019, there were nearly 900,000 jobs in Alameda County. Industries with the largest number of jobs (56% of the total) were Government; Health Care and Social Assistance; Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services; Manufacturing; and Leisure and Hospitality.In the next 10 years, Health Care and Social Assistance are projected to add the highest number of jobs (25,094) followed by Leisure and Hospitality (13,788), and Construction (10,506); these three industries represent about 59 percent of the county�s total projected job growth of 83,621.

 

Table 1: Job Projections for Alameda County by Industry Group � Projected Growth 2019 to 2029

 

Industry Group

Alameda County

2019 Jobs

2029 Jobs

Growth

All Industries

891,596

975,217

83,621

Government

121,091

124,449

3,358

Health Care and Social Assistance

115,997

141,091

25,094

Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services

90,183

99,713

9,529

Manufacturing

85,701

91,917

6,215

Leisure and Hospitality

83,838

97,626

13,788

Retail Trade

74,462

75,871

1,409

Construction

59,417

69,923

10,506

Administrative and Support and Waste Management and Remediation Services

48,739

51,324

2,585

Other Services, except Public Administration

40,506

42,565

2,059

Wholesale Trade

37,350

32,651

(4,699)

Transportation and Warehousing, and Utilities

36,713

41,304

4,591

Educational Services

24,294

27,433

3,138

Information

21,916

27,594

5,678

Finance and Insurance

19,958

20,284

���� 326

Management of Companies and Enterprises

16,559

15,953

�� (605)

Real Estate and Rental and Leasing

13,922

14,585

��� 662

Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining

������ 949

������ 934

���� (15)

 

 

 

 


 

Part B: Presentation of Student Achievement Data and Institution-Set Standards

 

Course Success Rates

 

Chart 10 shows success rates for all students in Las Positas College courses. Course success is defined as a grade of C or higher. Course success rates have been relatively stable between fall 2015 and fall 2020, ranging from a low of 70 percent to a high of 73 percent. Course success rates have been consistently the highest for Asian students, while course success rates have been consistently the lowest for African-American students. Latinx students generally had the second lowest course success rates.

 

Chart 10: Course Success Rates by Race/Ethnicity for Las Positas College Students, Fall 2015 to Fall 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fall-to-Fall Persistence Rates of New First-Time College Students by Race/Ethnicity

 

Chart 11 shows that fall-to-fall persistence rates for new, first-time college students has steadily increased from 62 percent for fall 2014 to 69 percent fall 2018; however, it fell to 62 percent for new first-time college students who started in fall 2019�this drop is likely due to the impact of COVID-19.Asian/Filipino students have had consistently the highest persistence rates while African-American students have consistently experienced the lowest rates. Latinx students consistently had the second lowest persistence rates.

 

Chart 11: Fall-to-Fall Retention Rates by Race/Ethnicity for First-Time College Students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Degrees Awarded

 

The number of associate degrees awarded increased from 499 in 2011-12 to 985 in 2020-21; this is an increase of 97 percent. A key driver of the increase has been the Associate Degrees for Transfer (ADTs), which were first awarded in 2012-13 when only five transfer degrees were awarded. Since then, the number of ADTs has increased dramatically to 457 in 2020-21 or 46% of all associate degrees awarded by the college.

 

Chart 12: Number of Associate Degrees and Associate Degrees for Transfer (ADT) Awarded, 2011-2012 to 2020-2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Certificates Awarded

 

The total number of certificates has increased from 142 in 2011-12 to 192 in 2020-21; this represents an increase of 35 percent. The trend in certificates typically shows an increase in one year, followed by a decrease in the year after, and then an increase in the following year.

 

Chart 13: Number of Certificates Awarded, 2011-2012 to 2020-2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Transfers to Public California Universities

 

The number of LPC students transferring to public universities in California increased from 543 in 2011-12 to a high of 856 in 2020-2. The majority of LPC students transferred to the California State University (CSU) system. The plurality (about 25%) of the students who transferred to a public California university transferred to CSU East Bay.

 

Chart 14: Number of LPC Transfers to a California Public 4-Year University System (UC/CSU), 2011-12 to 2020-21

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Institution-Set Standards and Stretch Goal

 

LPC has established institution-set standards and stretch goals for a number of metrics, including course completion rates, associate degree and certificate attainment, and transfers to CSU and UC campuses.Institution-set standards are levels of performance the college deems acceptable; they represent the �floor� rather than aspirational goals.The college defines institution-set standards as meeting or exceeding 95% of a five-year rolling average for a given metric. Stretch goals are aspirational and set at 101%, 105%, or 110% of a five-year rolling average depending on the metric.

 

Course Completion Rates

Chart 15 shows the institution-set standards for course completion rates (i.e., percentage of grades that are �C� or higher). Course completion rates have been generally stable and the institution-set standard has been met for all years. The course completion stretch goal has been met for five of the last ten years.

 

 

Chart 15: Course Completion Rates: Fall 2011 to Fall 2020

 

 

 

 

 

Degree Completions

Chart 16 shows the institution-set standards for associate degree completion.Students are counted once regardless of whether they complete more than one associate�s degree. The number of students awarded an associate�s degree has increased significantly and the institution-set standard has been met for nine out of the last ten years. The degree completion stretch goal has been met for five of the last ten years.

 

Chart 16: Degree Completions: 2011-12 to 2020-21

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Certificate Completions

Chart 17 shows the institution-set standards for certificate completion.Students are counted once regardless of whether they complete more than one certificate. While the number of students awarded a certificate has fluctuated, LPC has met the institution-set standard for eight of the last ten years. The certificate completion stretch goal has been met for five of the last ten years.

 

Chart 17: Certificate Completions: 2011-12 to 2020-21

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transfer Completions

Chart 18 shows the institution-set standards for LPC student transfers to CSU and UC campuses.The number of transfer students has steadily increased over most of the past decade, with the highest number of transfers in 2020-21. The institution-set standard for transfers has been met for all of the last ten years. The transfer completion stretch goal has been met for six of the last ten years.

 

Chart 18: Transfer Completions: 2011-12 to 2020-2021

 

 

 

Programmatic Accreditation

 

PUBLIC SAFETY

 

The LPC EMS/Paramedic Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon the recommendation of the Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for the Emergency Medical Services Professions (CoAEMSP). This accreditation is initial and expires on March 31, 2022.

 

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY

 

ASE Program Accreditation in: Master Automobile Service Technology. 1503 Edwards Ferry Rd., NE Suite 401, Leesburg VA 2017. Accreditation Expiration Date: 2/1/2030

 

 

Part C: Organization of the Self-Evaluation Process

 

The process for organizing the accreditation self-improvement process and writing the self-study report grew from two key changes since the last self-evaluation. First was a multiple-year commitment to an accreditation planning priority for the college. Second, a flexible structure for the Accreditation Steering Committee to better support the cycle of accreditation was implemented.

 

The �graduated� College Planning Priority is committed to implementing and integrating ACCJC standards throughout campus structure and processes. To support this process, ACCJC standards were mapped to committees and other areas of the college where the responsibility resides. As a lead-up to the midterm report, all committees and offices were asked to review the mapping and confirm the alignment of their committee charge and work with the assigned standard. Now, each year, per the Shared Governance Handbook, each committee reviews the assigned accreditation standards as part of an on-going process. The Accreditation Liaison Officer (ALO) maintains the mapping and reviews its currency with the Accreditation Steering Committee. Additionally, the ALO provides monthly updates to accreditation to the Academic Senate and College Council as well as weekly updates at Executive Staff Meetings.

 

The multi-year commitment to this planning priority supported the first step in writing the Institutional Self-Evaluation Report (ISER) was gathering evidence. Over the course of two years, committee chairs or responsible offices were asked to review the wording of the standards and submit the most relevant and current evidence to the college webmaster for storage in our evidence locker. In February of 2019 and 2020, items were collected and served as the evidentiary base for the kick-off of our ISER process. Progress on the accreditation planning priority was monitored by the Institutional Planning and Effective Committee (IPEC) with the submission of the written report and oral presentation.The planning priority was �graduated� in the spring of 2021, signaling that the standards for accreditation were fully integrated into the College processes.

 

The second innovation to support the accreditation process grew from shared governance structures. The Accreditation Steering Committee structure provides a flexible framework. In years during which accreditation work does not require the submission of major reports, the committee is kept to five voting committee members. In years during which work increases, the expanded steering committee welcomes eight administrators, eight classified members, and eight faculty members, all of whom are voting members. The committee was expanded in 2020-2021 to accommodate the work of the self-evaluation process.

 

In September of 2019, then ACCJC Liaison, Gohar Momjian, met with the ALO to review the new formative/summative process for ISER review being piloted by several schools. The formative/summative process was shared with the college during a Town Meeting on October 2, 2019 by Kristina Whalen, vice president of Academic Services, and faculty member John Ruys, primary author of the ACCJC Midterm Report.During the remainder of fall 2019 and during spring 2020, members of the expanded Accreditation Steering Committee were recruited and/or selected based on committee chair composition and a commitment for all constituent groups to provide input into the self-evaluation report. In March 2020, in response to a global pandemic, Las Positas College transitioned nearly all instruction and student services to a virtual modality.

 

Training for the new ISER process began in earnest on April 30, 2020 when the expanded Accreditation Steering Committee and campus leaders, 45 people in total, joined the ACCJC liaison to the district for a full explanation of the new process for focused site visits, resources used to complete the process, and breakout sessions to practice interpretation of standards in preparation for writing.

 

On August 25th, 2020, the full Expanded Accreditation Steering Committee met for a kick-off meeting. At that time a timeline for completing the writing was refined and adopted. Members of the Expanded Accreditation Steering Committee were assigned standards based on expertise. The committee and self-evaluation assignments also included district personnel.

 

Bi-weekly accreditation team meetings were held in fall 2020 and spring 2021 to discuss progress, address obstacles, and respond to questions.

 

Throughout the 2020-2021 academic year, coordination with the District�s leadership occurred. The vice chancellor of Educational Services and Student Success guided the completion of a function map, delineating each substandard as the primary responsibility of the district, colleges, or both.In January of 2021, the District Accreditation Coordination Committee established deadlines for the completion of standards for which the district was primary. At subsequent meetings, district support and best practices for completing the ISER were shared.

 

During the summer and early fall of 2021, edits to the Institutional Self Evaluation Report process were completed in preparation for constituency review. Throughout October of 2021, as major standards of the ISER were completed, the Executive Team, composed of the president and vice Presidents, reviewed drafted responses and provided feedback. The report was also reviewed by the Curriculum Committee, SLO Committee, Technology Committee, Distance Education, and Guided Pathways Committee. A campus review and feedback survey was administered to the campus to gather broad feedback and verify accuracy and conciseness. Formal presentations for feedback are documented below:

 

 

 

LPC

District

ACCJC

Academic Senate

October 13th

(1st reading)

October 27th

(2nd reading)

November 9th

(Final approval)

Classified Senate

October 7th

Student Senate

October 21st

IPEC

October 14th

College Council

October 28th

(1st reading)

November 18th

(Final approval)

District Office

October 28th (Penultimate Draft)

Board of Trustees

November 16th

(1st reading)

December 14th

(2nd reading)

ACCJC Novato Office

December 23rd

Site Peer Review Team

February 24th

(Core Inquiries)

 

 

Las Positas College 2022 Institutional Self-Evaluation Reports (ISER) Timeline

 

Las Positas College began preparation of the 2022 Institutional Self-Evaluation Report (ISER) in fall 2020. The below chart captures the timeline and process for completion of the report by the expanded accreditation steering team. In sum, each substandard team spent approximately two months of systematic engagement analyzing/interpreting the standard, matching collected evidence or gathering additional evidence, and then composing shorter and longer drafts

 

Steering Committee Date

Standard Process P1:

Interpretation

Standard Process P2:

Evidence Review

Standard Process P3:

Bullet Answers

Standard Process P4:

Draft Answers

August 25, 2020

 

Kick-Off Event

 

 

 

Sept 8, 2020

 

IC, Institutional Integrity

 

 

 

Sept 22, 2020

 

IIA. Instructional Programs, Standards 1-7

IC, Institutional Integrity

 

 

Oct 6, 2020

 

II.B, Library & Learning Resources

IIA Instructional Programs, Standards 1-7

IC, Institutional Integrity

 

Oct 20, 2020

 

II.C, Student Support Services

 

II.B, Library & Learning Resources

IIA Instructional Programs, Standards 1-7

IC, Institutional Integrity

Nov 9, 2020

I.A, Mission

II.C, Student Support Services

 

II.B, Library & Learning Resources

II.A Instructional Programs, Standards 1-7

Nov 23, 2020

 

I.A, Mission

II.C, Student Support Services

 

II.B, Library & Learning Resources

Dec 7, 2020

 

 

I.A, Mission

II.C, Student Support Services

 

 

 

 

Steering Committee Date

Standard Process P1:

Interpretation

Standard Process P2:

Evidence Review

Standard Process P3:

Bullet Answers

Standard Process P4:

Draft Answers

January 26, 2021

 

III.A, Human Resources

 

 

I.A, Mission

Feb 9, 2021

 

IIA. Instructional Programs, Standards 8-16

III.A, Human Resources

 

 

Feb 23, 2021

III.C, Technological Resources

IIA Instructional Programs, Standards 8-16

III.A, Human Resources

 

March 9, 2021

 

II.C, Financial Resources

 

III.C, Technological Resources

IIA Instructional Programs, Standards 8-16

III.A, Human Resources

March 30, 2021

 

I.B, Institutional Quality & Effectiveness

II.C, Financial Resources

 

III.C, Technological Resources

II.A Instructional Programs, Standards 8-16

April 13, 2021

 

IV. A, Decision-Making & Processes

I.B, Institutional Quality & Effectiveness

II.C, Financial Resources

 

III.C, Technological Resources

April 27, 2021

 

 

IV. A, Decision-Making & Processes

I.B, Institutional Quality & Effectiveness

II.C, Financial Resources

 

May 11, 2021

 

 

 

IV. A, Decision-Making & Processes

I.B, Institutional Quality & Effectiveness

 

 

Las Positas College 2022 Institutional Self-Evaluation Report (ISER)

Accreditation Steering Committee Members

 

Dr. Kristina Whalen

Vice President Academic Services, ALO, and Chair

Dr. Stuart McElderry

Dean, Editor

Rajinder S. Samra

Director of Research, Planning and Institutional Effectiveness

Dr. Tina Inzerilla

Faculty/Librarian

Dr. Elena Cole

Faculty

Tim Druley

Webmaster, Document/Archivist

Carolyn Scott

Executive Assistant Academic Services

 

 

Las Positas College 2022 Institutional Self-Evaluation Report (ISER)

Expanded Accreditation Steering Committee Members and Assignments

 

ACCJC Standard

Admin Lead

Faculty Lead(s)

Classified Lead(s)

I.A & I.B: Mission, Academic Quality & Institutional Effectiveness

 

Rajinder Samra

Nadiyah Taylor

Ann Hight

Madeline Wiest

I.C: Institutional Integrity

 

Kristina Whalen

Sarah Thompson

Tim Druley

II.A.: Instructional Programs

 

Stuart McElderry

Elena Cole

 

Andrea Migliaccio

II.B: Library & Learning Support Services

 

Stuart McElderry

Tina Inzerilla

Jin Tsubota

 

II.C: Student Support Services

 

Elizabeth David

Angella VenJohn

 

III.A: Human Resources

Kristina Whalen

Heike Gecox

Carolyn Scott

Angelica Cararez

III.B: Physical Resources

 

Owen Letcher

 

Mike Ansell

Denise Patlan

III.C: Technology Resources

 

Steve Gunderson

Titian Lish

Heidi Ulrech

III.D: Fiscal Resources

 

Anette Raichbart

Rajeev Chopra

Sui Song

IV.A Decision-making Roles & Processes

Kristina Whalen

 

Elena Cole

(with Student Lead Kyle Johnson)

David Rodriquez

IV. B: CEO

Dyrell Foster

 

Sheri Moore

Quality Focus Essay

 

 

Jin Tsubota

 

 

 

Part D: Organizational Information

 

Office of the President

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Office of the Vice President, Academic Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Office of the Vice President Administrative Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Office of the Vice President, Student Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

District-wide Function Map � Summary

The CLPCCD District-wide Function Map delineates District and College responsibility in accordance with the ACCJC 2014 Standards. The Function Map lists lead responsibilities to meet each of the 127 standard expectations using the following coded symbols:

-����� P = Primary Responsibility indicates leadership and oversight of a given function which may include design, development, implementation and successful integration.

-����� S = Secondary Responsibility indicates support of a given function which may include feedback, input and communication to assist with successful integration.

-����� SH = Shared Responsibility indicates the District and the Colleges are equally responsible for the leadership and oversight of a given function which may include design, development, implementation, and facilitation of input, feedback and communication for successful integration.

 

Standard I: Mission, Academic Quality and Institutional Effectiveness, and Integrity

A. Mission

College

District

Ref#

1.

The mission describes the institution�s broad educational purposes, its intended student population, the types of degrees and other credentials it offers, and its commitment to student learning and student achievement. (ER 6)

P

S

1

2.

The institution uses data to determine how effectively it is accomplishing its mission, and whether the mission directs institutional priorities in meeting the educational needs of students.

P

S

2

3.

The institution�s programs and services are aligned with its mission. The mission guides institutional decision-making, planning, and resource allocation and informs institutional goals for student learning and achievement.

P

S

3

4.

The institution articulates its mission in a widely published statement approved by the governing board. The mission statement is periodically reviewed and updated as necessary. (ER 6)

SH

SH

4

B. Assuring Academic Quality and Institutional Effectiveness

Academic Quality

College

District

1.

The institution demonstrates a sustained, substantive and collegial dialog about student outcomes, student equity, academic quality, institutional effectiveness, and continuous improvement of student learning and achievement.

P

S

5

2.

The institution defines and assesses student learning outcomes for all instructional programs and student and learning support services. (ER 11)

P

S

6

3.

The institution establishes institution-set standards for student achievement, appropriate to its mission, assesses how well it is achieving them in pursuit of continuous improvement, and publishes this information. (ER 11)

P

S

7

4.

The institution uses assessment data and organizes its institutional processes to support student learning and student achievement.

P

S

8

Institutional Effectiveness

College

District

5.

The institution assesses accomplishment of its mission through program review and evaluation of goals and objectives, student learning outcomes, and student achievement. Quantitative and qualitative data are disaggregated for analysis by program type and mode of delivery.

P

S

9

6.

The institution disaggregates and analyzes learning outcomes and achievement for subpopulations of students. When the institution identifies performance gaps, it implements strategies, which may include allocation or reallocation of human, fiscal and other resources, to mitigate those gaps and evaluates the efficacy of those strategies.

P

S

10

7.

The institution regularly evaluates its policies and practices across all areas of the institution, including instructional programs, student and learning support services, resource management, and governance processes to assure their effectiveness in supporting academic quality and accomplishment of mission.

SH

SH

11

8.

The institution broadly communicates the results of all of its assessment and evaluation activities so that the institution has a shared understanding of its strengths and weaknesses and sets appropriate priorities.

P

S

12

9.

The institution engages in continuous, broad based, systematic evaluation and planning. The institution integrates program review, planning, and resource allocation into a comprehensive process that leads to accomplishment of its mission and improvement of institutional effectiveness and academic quality. Institutional planning addresses short- and long-range needs for educational programs and services and for human, physical, technology, and financial resources. (ER 19)

P

S

13

C. Institutional Integrity

College

District

1.The institution assures the clarity, accuracy, and integrity of information provided to students and prospective students, personnel, and all persons or organizations related to its mission statement, learning outcomes, educational programs, and student support services. The institution gives accurate information to students and the public about its accreditation status with all of its accreditors. (ER 20)

SH

SH

14

2.The institution provides a print or online catalog for students and prospective students with precise, accurate, and current information on all facts, requirements, policies, and procedures listed in the �Catalog Requirements� (see endnote). (ER 20)

P

S

15

3.���� The institution uses documented assessment of student learning and evaluation of student achievement to communicate matters of academic quality to appropriate constituencies, including current and prospective students and the public. (ER 19)

P

S

16

4.���� The institution describes its certificates and degrees in terms of their purpose, content, course requirements, and expected learning outcomes.

P

S

17

5.���� The institution regularly reviews institutional policies, procedures, and publications to assure integrity in all representations of its mission, programs, and services.

P

S

18

6.���� The institution accurately informs current and prospective students regarding the total cost of education, including tuition, fees, and other required expenses, including textbooks, and other instructional materials.

P

S

19

7.��� In order to assure institutional and academic integrity, the institution uses and publishes governing board policies on academic freedom and responsibility. These policies make clear the institution�s commitment to the free pursuit and dissemination of knowledge, and its support for an atmosphere in which intellectual freedom exists for all constituencies, including faculty and students. (ER 13)

SH

SH

20

8.���� The institution establishes and publishes clear policies and procedures that promote honesty, responsibility and academic integrity. These policies apply to all constituencies and include specifics relative to each, including student behavior, academic honesty and the consequences for dishonesty.

P

S

21

9.���� Faculty distinguish between personal conviction and professionally accepted views in a discipline. They present data and information fairly and objectively.

P

S

22

10.�� Institutions that require conformity to specific codes of conduct of staff, faculty, administrators, or students, or that seek to instill specific beliefs or world views, give clear prior notice of such policies, including statements in the catalog and/or appropriate faculty and student handbooks.

P

S

23

11.�� Institutions operating in foreign locations operate in conformity with the Standards and applicable Commission policies for all students. Institutions must have authorization from the Commission to operate in a foreign location.

N/A

N/A

24

12.�� The institution agrees to comply with Eligibility Requirements, Accreditation Standards, Commission policies, guidelines, and requirements for public disclosure, institutional reporting, team visits, and prior approval of substantive changes. When directed to act by the Commission, the institution responds to meet requirements within a time period set by the Commission. It discloses information required by the Commission to carry out its accrediting responsibilities. (ER 21)

P

S

25

13.�� The institution advocates and demonstrates honesty and integrity in its relationships with external agencies, including compliance with regulations and statutes. It describes itself in consistent terms to all of its accrediting agencies and communicates any changes in its accredited status to the Commission, students, and the public. (ER 21)

P

S

26

14.�� The institution ensures that its commitments to high quality education, student achievement and student learning are paramount to other objectives such as generating financial returns for investors, contributing to a related or parent organization, or supporting external interests.

P

S

27

 

Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Support Services

A. Instructional Programs

College

District

Ref#

1.�� All instructional programs, regardless of location or means of delivery, including distance education and correspondence education, are offered in fields of study consistent with the institution�s mission, are appropriate to higher education, and culminate in student attainment of identified student learning outcomes, and achievement of degrees, certificates, employment, or transfer to other higher education programs. (ER 9 and ER 11)

P

S

28

2.��� (Applicable to institutions with comprehensive reviews scheduled after Fall 2019.) Faculty, including full time, part time, and adjunct faculty, regularly engage in ensuring that the content and methods of instruction meet generally accepted academic and professional standards and expectations. In exercising collective ownership over the design and improvement of the learning experience, faculty conduct systematic and inclusive program review, using student achievement data, in order to continuously improve instructional courses and programs, thereby ensuring program currency, improving teaching and learning strategies, and promoting student success.

P

S

29

3.�� The institution identifies and regularly assesses learning outcomes for courses, programs, certificates and degrees using established institutional procedures. The institution has officially approved and current course outlines that include student learning outcomes. In every class section students receive a course syllabus that includes learning outcomes from the institution�s officially approved course outline.

P

S

30

4.�� If the institution offers pre-collegiate level curriculum, it distinguishes that curriculum from college level curriculum and directly supports students in learning the knowledge and skills necessary to advance to and succeed in college level curriculum.

P

S

31

5.�� The institution�s degrees and programs follow practices common to American higher education, including appropriate length, breadth, depth, rigor, course sequencing, time to completion, and synthesis of learning. The institution ensures that minimum degree requirements are 60 semester credits or equivalent at the associate level, and 120 credits or equivalent at the baccalaureate level. (ER 12)

P

S

32

6.�� The institution schedules courses in a manner that allows students to complete certificate and degree programs within a period of time consistent with established expectations in higher education. (ER 9)

P

S

33

7.�� The institution effectively uses delivery modes, teaching methodologies and learning support services that reflect the diverse and changing needs of its students, in support of equity in success for all students.

P

S

34

8.�� The institution validates the effectiveness of department-wide course and/or program examinations, where used, including direct assessment of prior learning. The institution ensures that processes are in place to reduce test bias and enhance reliability.

SH

SH

35

9.�� The institution awards course credit, degrees and certificates based on student attainment of learning outcomes. Units of credit awarded are consistent with institutional policies that reflect generally accepted norms or equivalencies in higher education. If the institution offers courses based on clock hours, it follows Federal standards for clock-to-credit-hour conversions. (ER 10)

P

S

36

 

10. The institution makes available to its students clearly stated transfer-of-credit policies in order to facilitate the mobility of students without penalty. In accepting transfer credits to fulfill degree requirements, the institution certifies that the expected learning outcomes for transferred courses are comparable to the learning outcomes of its own courses. Where patterns of student enrollment between institutions are identified, the institution develops articulation agreements as appropriate to its mission. (ER 10)

P

S

37

11. The institution includes in all of its programs, student learning outcomes, appropriate to the program level, in communication competency, information competency, quantitative competency, analytic inquiry skills, ethical reasoning, the ability to engage diverse perspectives, and other program-specific learning outcomes.

P

S

38

12. The institution requires of all of its degree programs a component of general education based on a carefully considered philosophy for both associate and baccalaureate degrees that is clearly stated in its catalog. The institution, relying on faculty expertise, determines the appropriateness of each course for inclusion in the general education curriculum, based upon student learning outcomes and competencies appropriate to the degree level. The learning outcomes include a student�s preparation for and acceptance of responsible participation in civil society, skills for lifelong learning and application of learning, and a broad comprehension of the development of knowledge, practice, and interpretive approaches in the arts and humanities, the sciences, mathematics, and social sciences. (ER 12)

P

S

39

13. All degree programs include focused study in at least one area of inquiry or in an established interdisciplinary core. The identification of specialized courses in an area of inquiry or interdisciplinary core is based upon student learning outcomes and competencies, and include mastery, at the appropriate degree level, of key theories and practices within the field of study.

P

S

40

14. Graduates completing career-technical certificates and degrees demonstrate technical and professional competencies that meet employment standards and other applicable standards and preparation for external licensure and certification.

P

S

41

15. When programs are eliminated or program requirements are significantly changed, the institution makes appropriate arrangements so that enrolled students may complete their education in a timely manner with a minimum of disruption.

P

S

42

16. The institution regularly evaluates and improves the quality and currency of all instructional programs offered in the name of the institution, including collegiate, pre-collegiate, career-technical, and continuing and community education courses and programs, regardless of delivery mode or location. The institution systematically strives to improve programs and courses to enhance learning outcomes and achievement for students.

P

S

43

 

 

B. Library and Learning Support Services

College

District

1.

The institution supports student learning and achievement by providing library, and other learning support services to students and to personnel responsible for student learning and support. These services are sufficient in quantity, currency, depth, and variety to support educational programs, regardless of location or means of delivery, including distance education and correspondence education. Learning support services include, but are not limited to, library collections, tutoring, learning centers, computer laboratories, learning technology, and ongoing instruction for users of library and other learning support services. (ER 17)

P

S

44

2.

Relying on appropriate expertise of faculty, including librarians, and other learning support services professionals, the institution selects and maintains educational equipment and materials to support student learning and enhance the achievement of the mission.

P

S

45

3.

The institution evaluates library and other learning support services to assure their adequacy in meeting identified student needs. Evaluation of these services includes evidence that they contribute to the attainment of student learning outcomes. The institution uses the results of these evaluations as the basis for improvement.

P

S

46

4.������������ When the institution relies on or collaborates with other institutions or��

other sources for library and other learning support services for its instructional programs, it documents that formal agreements exist and that such resources and services are adequate for the institution�s intended purposes, are easily accessible and utilized. The institution takes responsibility for and assures the security, maintenance, and reliability of services provided either directly or through contractual arrangement. The institution regularly evaluates these services to ensure their effectiveness. (ER 17)

SH

SH

47

 

C. Student Support Services

College

District

1.

The institution regularly evaluates the quality of student support services and demonstrates that these services, regardless of location or means of delivery, including distance education and correspondence education, support student learning, and enhance accomplishment of the mission of the institution. (ER 15)

P

S

48

2.����� The institution identifies and assesses learning support outcomes for its student population and provides appropriate student support services and programs to achieve those outcomes. The institution uses assessment data to continuously improve student support programs and services.

P

S

49

3.����� The institution assures equitable access to all of its students by providing appropriate, comprehensive, and reliable services to students regardless of service location or delivery method. (ER 15)

P

S

50

4. ���� Co-curricular programs and athletics programs are suited to the institution�s mission and contribute to the social and cultural dimensions of the educational experience of its students. If the institution offers co-curricular or athletic programs, they are conducted with sound educational policy and standards of integrity. The institution has responsibility for the control of these programs, including their finances.

P

S

51

5.����� The institution provides counseling and/or academic advising programs to support student development and success and prepares faculty and other personnel responsible for the advising function. Counseling and advising programs orient students to ensure they understand the requirements related to their programs of study and receive timely, useful, and accurate information about relevant academic requirements, including graduation and transfer policies.

P

S

52

6.����� The institution has adopted and adheres to admission policies consistent with its mission that specify the qualifications of students appropriate for its programs. The institution defines and advises students on clear pathways to complete degrees, certificate and transfer goals. (ER 16)

P

S

53

7.����� The institution regularly evaluates admissions and placement instruments and practices to validate their effectiveness while minimizing biases.

P

S

54

8.����� The institution maintains student records permanently, securely, and confidentially, with provision for secure backup of all files, regardless of the form in which those files are maintained. The institution publishes and follows established policies for release of student records.

P

S

55

 

Standard III: Resources

A. Human Resources

College

District

Ref#

1.����� The institution assures the integrity and quality of its programs and services by employing administrators, faculty and staff who are qualified by appropriate education, training, and experience to provide and support these programs and services. Criteria, qualifications, and procedures for selection of personnel are clearly and publicly stated and address the needs of the institution in serving its student population. Job descriptions are directly related to institutional mission and goals and accurately reflect position duties, responsibilities, and authority.

SH

SH

56

2. ���� Faculty qualifications include knowledge of the subject matter and requisite skills for the service to be performed. Factors of qualification include appropriate degrees, professional experience, discipline expertise, level of assignment, teaching skills, scholarly activities, and potential to contribute to the mission of the institution. Faculty job descriptions include development and review of curriculum as well as assessment of learning. (ER 14)

SH

SH

57

3. ���� Administrators and other employees responsible for educational programs and services possess qualifications necessary to perform duties required to sustain institutional effectiveness and academic quality.

SH

SH

58

4. ���� Required degrees held by faculty, administrators and other employees are from institutions accredited by recognized U.S. accrediting agencies. Degrees from non- U.S. institutions are recognized only if equivalence has been established.

S

P

59

5.����� The institution assures the effectiveness of its human resources by evaluating all personnel systematically and at stated intervals. The institution establishes written criteria for evaluating all personnel, including performance of assigned duties and participation in institutional responsibilities and other activities appropriate to their expertise. Evaluation processes seek to assess effectiveness of personnel and encourage improvement. Actions taken following evaluations are formal, timely, and documented.

SH

SH

60

6. ���� (No longer applicable effective January 2018, Standard III.A.6).

x

7. ���� The institution maintains a sufficient number of qualified faculty, which includes full time faculty and may include part time and adjunct faculty, to assure the fulfillment of faculty responsibilities essential to the quality of educational programs and services to achieve institutional mission and purposes. (ER 14)

P

S

61

8. ���� An institution with part time and adjunct faculty has employment policies and practices which provide for their orientation, oversight, evaluation, and professional development. The institution provides opportunities for integration of part time and adjunct faculty into the life of the institution.

SH

SH

62

9. ���� The institution has a sufficient number of staff with appropriate qualifications to support the effective educational, technological, physical, and administrative operations of the institution. (ER 8)

P

S

63

10. �� The institution maintains a sufficient number of administrators with appropriate preparation and expertise to provide continuity and effective administrative leadership and services that support the institution�s mission and purposes. (ER 8)

P

S

64

11.The institution establishes, publishes, and adheres to written personnel policies and procedures that are available for information and review. Such policies and procedures are fair and equitably and consistently administered.

S

P

65

12.Through its policies and practices, the institution creates and maintains appropriate programs, practices, and services that support its diverse personnel. The institution regularly assesses its record in employment equity and diversity consistent with its mission.

SH

SH

66

13.The institution upholds a written code of professional ethics for all of its personnel, including consequences for violation.

SH

SH

67

14.The institution plans for and provides all personnel with appropriate opportunities for continued professional development, consistent with the institutional mission and based on evolving pedagogy, technology, and learning needs. The institution systematically evaluates professional development programs and uses the results of these evaluations as the basis for improvement.

P

S

68

15.The institution makes provision for the security and confidentiality of personnel records. Each employee has access to his/her personnel records in accordance with law.

S

P

69

B. Physical Resources

College

District

1.

The institution assures safe and sufficient physical resources at all locations where it offers courses, programs, and learning support services. They are constructed and maintained to assure access, safety, security, and a healthful learning and working environment.

S

P

70

2. ���� The institution plans, acquires or builds, maintains, and upgrades or replaces its physical resources, including facilities, equipment, land, and other assets, in a manner that assures effective utilization and the continuing quality necessary to support its programs and services and achieve its mission.

S

P

71

3.����� To assure the feasibility and effectiveness of physical resources in supporting institutional programs and services, the institution plans and evaluates its facilities and equipment on a regular basis, taking utilization and other relevant data into account.

P

S

72

4. ���� Long-range capital plans support institutional improvement goals and reflect projections of the total cost of ownership of new facilities and equipment.

SH

SH

73

 

C. Technology Resources

College

District

1.

Technology services, professional support, facilities, hardware, and software are appropriate and adequate to support the institution�s management and operational functions, academic programs, teaching and learning, and support services.

SH

SH

74

2.����� The institution continuously plans for, updates and replaces technology to ensure its technological infrastructure, quality and capacity are adequate to support its mission, operations, programs, and services.

SH

SH

75

3.��� The institution assures that technology resources at all locations where it offers courses, programs, and services are implemented and maintained to assure reliable access, safety, and security.

P

S

76

4.����� The institution provides appropriate instruction and support for faculty, staff, students, and administrators, in the effective use of technology and technology systems related to its programs, services, and institutional operations.

SH

SH

77

5.��� The institution has policies and procedures that guide the appropriate use of technology in the teaching and learning processes.

S